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beam shaping setup

beam shaping

spatial light modulator

Beam shapers, beam splitters, CGHs, kinoforms, SLMs
The VirtualLab Diffractive Optics Toolbox program is for designing, optimizing and simulating diffractive optical elements such as: beam shapers, beam homogenizers and beam splitters. These are sometimes called diffractive diffusers, computer-generated holograms or kinoforms.

For pattern-generation, an image can be imported into VirtualLab. The Diffractive Optics Toolbox develops an intial phase function using Interative Fourier Transform Algorithm (IFTA). Then, Thin Element Approximation (TEA) and Parametric Optimization are used to finalize a physical structure for a multi-level diffractive lens or a metalens.
A phase mask can also be generated for exporting to a spatial light modulator.

A practical feature of the Diffractive Optics Toolbox is the available session editor (wizard) which guides users through the workflow for diffractive optical design and simulation.

The Diffractive Optics Toolbox also includes parametric optimization for optimizing and tolerancing DOE design.

The resulting DOE structure can be exported to a fabrication file in several formats, including: GDSII, CIF, Bitmap, ASCII/.csv, Point-Cloud, STL.
As mentioned, a phase mask can also be exported to a spatial light modulator

Although the Diffractive Optics Toolbox can operate independently, it is most often used with the VirtualLab Starter Toolbox, because the Starter Toolbox can include all the optical elements in a light path, in addition to the DOE or SLM. The Starter Toolbox can include sources, all optical elements, detectors and analyzers. It includes parametric optimization for the entire optical system, such as distances, angles, sizes, etc.
 

2D grating

3D grating

volume holographic grating

Gratings: surface, high NA, subwavelength, volume holographic, Bragg, wire grid polarizers
The VirtualLab Grating Toolbox program is for rigorous design, optimization and simulation of periodic structures. It uses fully vectorial Fourier Modal Method (FMM), which is the same as Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis (RCWA).

The Grating Order Analyzer in the VirtualLab Grating Toolbox shows Rayleigh coefficients and diffraction efficiencies of grating orders. Diffraction efficiencies can be shown graphically or in a table. Graphical coordinates can be specified in spherical angles, cartesian angles, wave vector components or positions.
Diffraction efficiencies can be shown for all orders, a selected range of orders, or only diffraction efficiencies above a specified threshold.
Rayleigh coefficients can be shown for Ex, Ey, Ez, TE or TM.

In addition to diffraction efficiencies, other features include: near field and far field distributions, reflectance, transmittance, absorption, field inside grating and polarization of diffraction orders

The Polarization Analyzer in the Grating Toolbox allows the evaluation of the wavelengths and angular dependency of polarizing gratings.

Parametric Optimization can be used to determine performance, such as: grating efficiency vs wavelength or efficiency uniformity for a specified spectral range.
Mulitple parameters can be varied, such as: modulation depth and slit width.
Also, multiple merit functions can be varied, such as: efficiency in a particular direction or polarization contrast.

The Grating Toolbox uses a stack concept to configure grating structures. A stack can be a sequence of individual interfaces, or it can be a medium, such as a volume grating medium. Coatings can be added as needed.
Measured and programmable height profiles can be included in grating stacks. Programmable index of refraction distribution can also be used.
The Grating Toolbox includes catalogs of interface types, materials and coatings. You can also create or import other items to the catalogs for future use.

When used along with the Starter Toolbox program, VirtualLab is an integrated software suite of programs for modeling all the microscale and macroscale components in an optical system.
 

non-sequential channels

interferometer

telescope

lightguide

Non-sequential applications: interferometers, telescopes, light guides, reflections, ghost images, stray light
The Non-Sequential Extension is for applications that are significantly affected by reflections, ghost images and stray light. Some applications require reflections for split light paths (interferometers) and folded light paths (telescopes, light guides, prisms and etalons). Other applications are degraded by unwanted reflections, ghost images and stray light. Modeling all of these applications is simplified when the Non-Sequential Extension is used along with the VirtualLab Starter Toolbox.

It is unique that VirtualLab offers both non-sequential ray tracing and non-sequential physical optics in one software suite. With the Non-Sequential Extension and Starter Toolbox, it is easy to switch back and forth between sequential and non-sequential tracing.
It is also easy to switch between ray tracing and physical optics.

Non-sequential channels can be configured at each surface in an optical system. Forward, left-to-right propagation is defined as the + direction, and right-to-left propagation is defined as the - direction. At each surface the non-sequential configuration is set up as +/+, +/-, -/-, or -/+ propagation directions, as shown in the first figure on the left.


The Grating Order Analyzer in the VirtualLab Grating Toolbox shows Rayleigh coefficients and diffraction efficiencies of grating orders. Diffraction efficiencies can be shown graphically or in a table. Graphical coordinates can be specified in spherical angles, cartesian angles, wave vector components or positions.
Diffraction efficiencies can be shown for all orders, a selected range of orders, or only diffraction efficiencies above a specified threshold.
Rayleigh coefficients can be shown for Ex, Ey, Ez, TE or TM.

In addition to diffraction efficiencies, other features include: near field and far field distributions, reflectance, transmittance, absorption, field inside grating and polarization of diffraction orders

The Polarization Analyzer in the Grating Toolbox allows the evaluation of the wavelengths and angular dependency of polarizing gratings.

Parametric Optimization can be used to determine performance, such as: grating efficiency vs wavelength or efficiency uniformity for a specified spectral range.
Mulitple parameters can be varied, such as: modulation depth and slit width.
Also, multiple merit functions can be varied, such as: efficiency in a particular direction or polarization contrast.

The Grating Toolbox uses a stack concept to configure grating structures. A stack can be a sequence of individual interfaces, or it can be a medium, such as a volume grating medium. Coatings can be added as needed.
Measured and programmable height profiles can be included in grating stacks. Programmable index of refraction distribution can also be used.
The Grating Toolbox includes catalogs of interface types, materials and coatings. You can also create or import other items to the catalogs for future use.

When used along with the Starter Toolbox program, VirtualLab is an integrated software suite of programs for modeling all the microscale and macroscale components in an optical system.
 

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